Top Book Self-Publishing Companies and Compare and Contrast the Lowest Priced Ones

Top Book Self-Publishing Companies and Compare and Contrast the Lowest Priced Ones

If you are an aspiring writer or a novice writer, you may wonder where or on which sites you can (or should) self-publish your own novel and in what formats (hardcover, paperback and / or ebook). Or you are probably a veteran writer who has been publishing books in the same way for a while and you are looking for other options for publishing books. Then you have come to the right place.

Before we get into book publishing options, let’s talk about the biggest places where readers pick up books (in other words, the places where you want to sell your books). Below are the authors’ biggest retail options:• Rakuten Kobo• Apple iBooks• Amazon• Google Play• Apple iBooks• Barnes & Noble/Nook

In today’s article we will discuss about hardcover, paperbacks, eBooks and around top book self-publishing companies and compare and contrast the lowest priced ones.

Top Book Self-Publishing Companies and Compare and Contrast the Lowest Priced Ones Options

1. Barnes & Noble Press (Nook)

Formats: Hardcover, paperback, eBook.

Distribution: Strictly to Barnes & Noble Press.

Pricing: They are yours, after the book is sold, it takes percent of the book sales. This means they take percentages depending on how you price your book.

Pros:• You can offer preorders on all formats. • On this platform Exclusive marketing for all authors, there are all kinds of opportunities for self-promotion.

Cons:• Here Burns and a retailer and book retailers have gone out of business in recent years.

2. Google Play

Formats: eBook.

Distribution: Strictly to Google Play.

Pricing: They take one percent of those book sales after they sell your book. This means they take percentages depending on how you price your book.

Pros: On this platform Exclusive marketing for all authors, there are all kinds of opportunities for self-promotion.

3. Amazon KDP (Kindle Direct Publishing)

Formats: Paperback and eBook.

Distribution: You can easily list or select all your books in KDP’s extended distribution. However, here they currently only work with U.S. distributors.

Pricing: They are yours, after the book is sold, it takes one percent of the book sales. This means they take percentages depending on how you price your book.• You can upload all your books for free by creating an account with KDP here. Here you only pay for all types of evidence or copies of the author. 

Pros:• Good customer service/response time.• Real-time dashboard metrics.

Cons:• Doesn’t offer hardcovers.• Doesn’t offer preorders for paperbacks.

4. Apple iBooks

Formats: eBook.

Distribution: Strictly to iBooks

Pricing: They are yours, after the book is sold, it takes percent of the book sales. This means they take percentages depending on how you price your book.

Pros:• On this platform Exclusive marketing for all authors, there are all kinds of opportunities for self-promotion.• This platform is growing day by day with more popularity in the U.S. 

Cons:• In the past, you would need an Apple computer to upload all your books directly to this platform.

5. IngramSpark

Formats: Hardcover, paperback, eBook.

Distribution: Ingram Spark is a book distribution company.

Pricing: You have to pay to upload all kinds of books on this platform.

Pros:• You can offer hardcovers.• You can offer paperbacks and hardcovers for preorder.

Cons:• They can get your book to many different places, but your book isn’t always available to libraries and retailers.• No real-time data. (For example, Ingram Spark doesn’t offer any metrics for preorders.)• The platform isn’t user-friendly (confusing to use).

6. Draft2Digital

This is an aggregator. 

Formats: eBook.

Distribution: Barnes & Noble, Amazon, iBooks (Apple), Rakuten Kobo, Bibliotheca, OverDrive, Tolino, Hoopla, Vivlio, Baker & Taylor.

Pricing: They are yours, after the book is sold, it takes percent of the book sales. This means they take percentages depending on how you price your book.

Pros:• You don’t have to upload directly to tons of different retailers.• They take your e-book to digital platforms for the library that would otherwise be difficult for you to access. 

Cons:• They take a percentage of your sales.

7. Working Directly with a Manufacturer

Pros:• You have more flexibility for the format and special features of your book. You are limited in what the manufacturers can do.• You sell directly to consumers and their information (versus selling through a retailer who does not share their customer information with you).

Cons:• You may need to order books in bulk and store them in your home.• Depending on your model, you may need to send the book directly to the customer (vs. the book sent to the customer on the printer).• You cannot access an existing reader base (such as readers actively searching for books on Amazon or iBooks). Or more than your luck for success in your business hard work needs to be done.

A few other publishing options:• StreetLib• BookBaby• XinXii• LuLu• PublishDrive• Blurb

Which self-publishing company should you choose?

In my opinion, it comes down to what you have more, money or time.

If you have more time than money, uploading directly to the”Big Five” platforms (Amazon, Kobo, Google Play, iBooks / Apple and Nook / Burns and Noble) may be the best option for you. That way, you don’t have an aggregator that receives a percentage of your revenue above the percentage that any retailer receives.

The downside of going straight is to do a lot more when the tax season is in full swing. You need to get reports from every platform that uploads and sells books. Spending and sales are far more tracked.

If you have more money than time, using an aggregator may be the best option for you. In this case the aggregator will receive one percent of your sales (usually about 10-15%). However, you only need to pull a few reports during the tax season.

Conclusion: Which publication is best suited for you and your books may depend on your author goals, your financial situation, and how much time you will be able to devote to the publication process of your book.

Always remember that no publishing platform is perfect. But there are a lot more publishing options today than there were a few years ago and I expect that indie writers will have even more options in the coming years.

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